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ZIGGY 2


The third of the 23 rescued and feral cats that found their way to our door was a kitten we called Ziggy 2. He was rescued from the farm with too many cats and kittens all in need of a great deal more care than they were getting.

Just a bundle of fluff, we loved him as soon as we saw him and he became a life-long friend of our Persian cat Willow who had been so excited when we brought him home. She would run after him, catch him and hold him with her front paws whilst pounding him with her back legs. Ziggy screamed and screamed until Willow let him go. He ran away, then ran back for more. He was tough and this was a great game.

Ziggy would love to roam across neighbouring fields during the summer but when we whistled to indicate we were going to go for a walk around our field garden he ran all the way home to join us. He just loved to accompany us on a walk. We would all end up sitting together enjoying the sunshine (we had other kittens as well by this time) and the cats would either sit on our laps, play fight each other, pretend to hunt through the long grass, or just lay on their backs and sleep. It was a lovely time of togetherness, enjoyed by all and at the end of our visit there was a race back home by the cats to see who could run the fastest.

Ziggy used to enjoyed hunting in the snow, not sure what to make of it all, but now he is 15 years old, he prefers to sleep in the warmest place he can find in winter, however in Spring several cats insist on catching a baby rabbit every day. They eat the skin, the bones, the teeth, the whole body leaving just one back leg and a tail with perhaps the kidneys lying around. I try to rescue them when I hear their screams but the cats growl like a dog if you try to take away their prize. When I can, I put them out to a safe place in the long grass and tell them “I can only rescue you once, so don’t get caught again!”

One misty moisty morning, when there seemed to be a cloud hugging the grass to a depth of about a foot, we spotted a ginger tail held high, Ziggy was buried in the cloud of mist. Every few minutes you would see him jump as high as he could, take a quick look around to get his bearings and then continue with his hunting. It was such great fun and kept him amused for ages.

Foxes would sometimes kill the adult moorhens nesting on our pond leaving the chicks to fend for themselves. When this happened Ziggy would bring me the tiny chicks safely carried in his mouth, so that I could take care of them. This was almost impossible, so I just took them back. He did his best for them and I felt so guilty I could not do more to help.

Ziggy thrives on cuddles and attention and he is so big he can only get half onto your lap, but if you stop stroking or rubbing his head, he begs for more. He is also something of a coward as his annual trip to the Vet for his jabs is always accompanied by his terrible crying all the way there. He never cries on the way back!

The full story and many more are in the book “Viewed From My Window” by Patricia Oliver price £10 + £1.75 p&p. For more details, contact Patricia on 01202 826244. All proceeds go towards the Veterinary and Welfare needs of the 16 feral cats currently in her care.

Viewed-from-my-Window-May-2011-book-cover

The full story and many more are in the book “Viewed From My Window” by Patricia Oliver price £10 + £1.75 p&p. For more details, contact Patricia on 01202 826244. All proceeds go towards the Veterinary and Welfare needs of the 16 feral cats currently in her care.